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By using f(x)= syntax, your are defining a Symbolic function of the symbolic variable x. Then floor(x) is a symbolic expression. And mod just don't eat a symbolic expression as first argument.

sage: a = floor(x)
sage: type(a)
<type 'sage.symbolic.expression.Expression'>
sage: mod(a, 5)   # raises value error

Use Python way of defining a function:

sage: def f(x): return mod(floor(x), 5)
sage: f(17.3)
2

See also Some Common Issues with Functions in the Sage Guided tour.

By using f(x)= syntax, your are defining a Symbolic function of the symbolic variable x. Then floor(x) is a symbolic expression. And mod just don't eat a symbolic expression as first argument.

sage: a = floor(x)
sage: type(a)
<type 'sage.symbolic.expression.Expression'>
sage: mod(a, 5)   # raises value type error

Use Python way of defining a function:

sage: def f(x): return mod(floor(x), 5)
sage: f(17.3)
2

See also Some Common Issues with Functions in the Sage Guided tour.

By using f(x)= syntax, your are defining a Symbolic function of the symbolic variable x. Then floor(x) is a symbolic expression. And mod just don't eat a symbolic expression as first argument.

sage: a = floor(x)
sage: type(a)
<type 'sage.symbolic.expression.Expression'>
sage: mod(a, 5)   # raises type error

Use Python way of defining a function:

sage: def f(x): return mod(floor(x), 5)
sage: f(17.3)
2

See also this post or the section Some Common Issues with Functions in the Sage Guided tour.